How to Use the Book ‘What To Do When Your Child Gets Sick’: A Train-the-Trainer Session

Diana Gonzalez, MPH

Diana Gonzalez, MPH

Diana Peña, MPH, Institute for Healthcare Advancement

Diana Peña’s preconference session began with a brief introduction to the Institute for Healthcare Advancement and the production of their “What To Do” book series.  The book “What To Do When Your Child Gets Sick” was chosen for the training since it is the organization’s flagship book.  She then gave an introduction to the mock training with a discussion on how a trainer would prepare to administer the class. She mentioned strategies to increase the probability of a successful class such as providing childcare and sending reminders to participants.

The mock training was delivered as though Peña were facilitating training to consumers who would use the book at home with their families. The training began with a video created by the Kansas Head Start Association.  The movie gave expert insight on the effectiveness of the book as well as its utility for parents. Later participants were introduced to the easy to use format of the book and practiced using the book with real life scenarios.

Lastly the train-the-trainer model was delivered as though the participants in the session were trainers for the book.  Peña reviewed subject matters needed to deliver an effective session such as health literacy, culture, and adult learning.  She discussed the importance of understanding and teaching in a manner that acknowledges the health literacy levels of adults.  Participants were then given the opportunity to practice two techniques that acknowledge participant health literacy levels, teach back and plain language.  The remaining of the session focused on managing classroom situations such as too many question, limited time, and managing disagreements.

Discussion on managing classroom situations allowed participants to share experiences and knowledge as well as brainstorm new ideas.  The session ended with a wrap up activity that brought all ideas together.  Participants were to pick a section of the book and use plain language to describe this section to another participant.  Then participants checked to see how well they explained the section by using teach-back.  This was a great way for participants to practice with the book as well as practice newly learned skills.